Aaron Schurger, PhD

This web site is being phased out. Please visit my new web site.

The neuroscience of "when?" in perception and action

Post-doctoral researcher, Dehaene Lab
INSERM U992 / NeuroSpin / CEA-Saclay
Bât 145, Point courier 156
91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex FRANCE
(tel) +33 1 69 08 66 47 (fax) +33 1 69 08 79 73

aaron [dot] schurger [at] gmail [dot] com

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Aaron Schurger

Research interests

I use neuroimaging, computational modeling, and brain-machine interfaces in order to study temporal uncertainty and causal inference in perception and action. In particular I am interested in the unconstrained detection of and reaction to uncertain events in continuous time. In the limit, where sensory evidence is nil, this leads to the mystery of spontaneous self initiated movement: when do I make my next movement and how does this decision emerge in the brain in the absence of an external imperative? My research to date has focused on identifying specific correlates of near-threshold sensory perception, and on the neural antecedents of self-initiated movement. A further goal is to integrate these two areas of research in the study of foraging behaviors in humans and other animals. I am very keen on machine learning and signal processing techniques for data analysis, as well as diffusion and recurrent neuronal network models.

Reasearch highlights:

Reducing multi-sensor data to a single time course that reveals experimental effects (with Sebastien Marti & Stanislas Dehaene)

An accumulator model for spontaneous neural activity prior to self-initiated movement (with Jaco Sitt and Stanislas Dehaene) link | pdf
...commentary in the New Scientist

Stability of conscious sensory representations (with Stanislas Dehaene, in review)

Reproducibility distinguishes conscious from non-conscious neural representations (with Francisco Pereira, Anne Treisman, and Jonathan D. Cohen) link | pdf
...commentary in the New Scientist

Blindsight, gamma oscillations, and the relationship between attention and awareness (with Catherine Tallon-Baudry and the late Alan Cowey)